Is Jobs Engine Running Out of Steam?


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After experiencing optimism earlier in the year, there are signs that the U.S. jobs engine might be slowing. Certainly, the turmoil experienced in China, Europe, and the Middle East are finally starting to drag down the economy.  Then the lack of robust business investment is especially problematic.  Unless that turns around soon, we might be approaching recessionary status.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released its jobs report for September and it showed a steady unemployment rate of 5.1 percent with an increase of 142,000. Labor force participation rate continues its steady trickle downward to 62.4 percent, though the employment to population ratio showed a modest tick up to 59.2 percent.

Even though the unemployment rate remains steady, the rate of job growth has slowed. Over the last three months covering July-September, we have experienced an average of 167,000 jobs. That is almost a 30 percent decline from last year’s rate.  With construction, manufacturing and wholesale trade showing little change, that offers a hint that this downward trend could continue as we head toward winter.

It is troubling that business investment hasn’t followed suit with consumer spending.  Though household spending has been relatively healthy at 3.2 percent over the last year, we cannot say the same for industry.

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Even though some of that can be attributed to uncertainty from various political and global events, it will be difficult to maintain a robust economy without further investment.  Both shipments and new orders of core capital goods have shown negative growth over the last year.

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Another issue is that wages remain stagnant.  Over the last year, wages have grown at a 2.2 percent pace, which is well below what we experienced pre-recession.  Until we see wages approach the 3 percent clip, it will be difficult to imagine a more robust economy in the future.

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Is this the beginning of a downward spiral?

 

Recent Job Reports Charting Success


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The February jobs report was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday.  It paints a relatively rosy picture with solid job growth of 295,000 and a declining unemployment rate that reached 5.5 percent.  Wall Street Journal’s Real Time Economics provides an informative snapshot of the recent job trends in employment.

Chart 1:  Year-to-year job gains are steadily rising.

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Chart 2:  Unemployment rate continues to fall.

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Chart 3:  Labor force participation rate continues to fall which is not good, but employment to population ratio is rising, which is good.

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Chart 4:  Even though the type of jobs are improving, we are still seeing more part-time jobs than full-time jobs.

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Chart 5:  Unemployment rate is falling for all levels of education.

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Chart 6:  Long-term unemployment rate has steadily fallen, suggesting that the job market is improving.

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Chart 7:  While length of unemployment remains higher than pre-recession period, it is also falling.

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Chart 8:  While long-term unemployment is still above pre-recession levels, short-term unemployment is below it.

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Chart 9:  Even though average hourly wages remain relatively stagnant, the number of hours worked is rising, which is driving up average weekly earnings over the last quarter.

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Chart 10:  Recent surge in employment suggests that we might be near full employment.

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When evaluating labor markets, it is more useful to evaluate them over an extended period.   Most of these ten charts suggest that the U.S. labor market is headed in the right direction.