Tax Burden In U.S. Rates Low Among Peers


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While attention is paid to marginal tax rates, the true measure of what an individual pays in taxes is the effective tax rate.  This is what individuals pay after taking out tax credits and deductions.  Even though Canada has a lower  top marginal tax rate of 29% compared to the U.S. rate of 39.6, the U.S. has a much lower effective tax rate.  The G-7 is my primary group that I am using in comparing the United States.  Those countries include the Canada, France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Japan, and United States

Information comes from a 2012 Annual Survey performed by KPMG International, which covered 114 countries.  It should be noted that this survey took place before the increase in individual tax rates for individuals making over $400,000.  However, the scope of this review wouldn’t cover that range anyway.

From this survey, we learned that the U.S. effective tax rate for individuals making $100,000 is 18.7%, compared to Canada’s 27.4%.  The only rich country with a lower effective tax rate would be Japan at 15.2%.  Here are the rankings:

  1. Italy:  35.6%:
  2. Germany:  28.3%
  3. Canada:  27.4%
  4. United Kingdom:  24.1%
  5. France:  20.0%
  6. United States:  18.7%
  7. Japan:  15.2%

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When looking at individuals making $300,000, the U.S. effective tax rate increases to 26.8%, while Canada, is at 39.8%.  Of the rich countries, Japan is the closest to matching the U.S. in effective tax rates, but it is higher too at 30.7%.  Here are the rankings:

  1. Italy:  41.8%
  2. Canada:  39.8%
  3. Germany:  39.0%
  4. United Kingdom:  38.5%
  5. France:  34.0%
  6. Japan:  30.7%
  7. United States:  26.8%

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This analysis should quiet critics, who believe that the U.S. tax system is burdensome.

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